Rock is the New Roll: The Top 100 Albums of 2019 (40-31)

Here it is, the long-awaited list of the best albums of 2019. It has been a really great year for music. We heard from a couple of deceased legends in Harry Nilsson and Leonard Cohen, were treated with new records from Texas Honky Tonk legends Jack Ingram, Corb Lund, and Dale Watson, and bright lights shone for the first time with a bevy of new artists to discover including the one name wonders Lizzo and Yola.

Rock is not dead with White Reaper, Drugdealer and Balck Country Communion all inviting us to a party like it’s 1979. And of course, the singer-songwriter is back. The Boss, Bruce Springsteen, is back and better than ever and Rock is the New Roll favorite Tom Russell gave us a history lesson in 11 songs with October in the Railroad Earth.

This year we will be releasing our top 100 list 10 tasty gems at a time, so sit back, grab your favorite beverage, and enjoy the ear-pleasing top 100 records of the year.

40. Bedouine – Bird Songs of a Killjoy

’60s Folk meets 70’s Country-Funk on this one, Azniv Korkejian performing under the name Bedouine delivers a sparse yet eclectic vibe with a slight touch of bossa nova cool that makes things all the more interesting.

39. Jack Ingram – Ridin’ High Again

The album title along with every song on the record pays tribute to Jerry Jeff Walker and Texas hill country. “Straight Outta Jail” is a Lyle Lovett inspired gem and the sublime version of “Desperadoes Waiting For A Train” is the stuff Texas Legends are made from. Welcome back, Jack Ingram.

38. Big Search – Slow Fascination

If you are a fan of the Laurel Canyon Beach Boys West Coast vibe then the new record, Slow Fascination, by Big Search, definitely is your jam. Big Search is the solo moniker for Matthew Popieluch, who, when he is not sitting in as a sideman for bands like Papercuts and Fools Gold is creating lush Indie Pop orchestrations. Pianos and acoustic guitars blend delightfully with soaring harmonies and intricate arrangements.

37. Chuck Mead – Close To Home

With more than a passing homage to Chuck Berry, Honky Tonks, and good old Rock and Roll, this record could have come right from Sun Studios circa 1957.

36. Steve Earle – Guy

I would guess when Steve Earle stood on Bob Dylan’s coffee table and proclaimed Townes Van Zant the best songwriter ever that Guy Clark must have been a close second. This collection of songs is nothing short of terrific. With his band playing just the right notes at just the right times, the song “Old Friends” with cameos from Terry Allen, Jerry Jeff Walker, Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, and Jo Harvey Allen is worth the price of admission alone.

35. Marvin Gaye – You’re the Man

for some strange reason, this album never saw the light of day when it was originally recorded in 1972. Billed as the “Lost” album, this one was recorded between Marvin Gaye’s masterwork, “What’s Going On” and 1973’s “Let’s Get It On. Reviews of the day called it ” A mostly disjointed affair”,  which explains why it never reached proper release standards, But, when you stack it against what we are exposed to on the present-day music scene, it is a top of the pops effort.

34. Ex Hex – It’s Real

Ex Hex is Mary Timony, Betsy Wright and Laura Harris, all veterans of the Indie Rock scene over the last decade or so. Sort of a more punk version of the Pretenders, the crunching guitars and the glittering sheen that is filtered throughout the record will have you spinning back to those days when Rock and Roll was nothing but fun.

33. Kenny Wayne Sheppard – The Traveller

Kenny Wayne Sheppard with each release seems to be more and more comfortable with his place in the pantheon of guitar slingers. His latest, a Classic Rock concoction of Blues, Boogie, and Rock is a powerhouse. Singer Noah Hunt is in fine grizzled form still sounding like Warren Zevon’s less drug-addled brother, and Stevie Ray’s old stick man Chris Layton pushes the band down the rails like a runaway train. Including eight originals and two covers, the best of the lot being a scorched earth version of Neil’s Mr. Soul, this one might be the band’s best record to date.

32. The Reconstructed – Great North Wind

Whoever said that the only good music comes out of Austin, the left or the right coast, or New York, have obviously never heard of The Reconstructed, the best thing to come out of Southern Maine since the lobster. Their latest record, Great North Wind, is a melodic stunner of an album with delicious hooks, sweet vocals, and enough of a Power Pop sensibility to make Alex Chilton jealous. The opener, “Cross Talk” is what the stork would have delivered if the parents were the Bands Crazy Horse and The Bodeans, and the title track shares some DNA with Jason Isbell and the 400 unit. “Wrapped” sounds like it could have been a R.E.M. B-side, “50 Minute Records” features next-level songwriting, and “Talking With Your Ghost” rhythmically carries a bit of a John Mellencamp torch.

In short, while bits, pieces, and resemblances of other great bands might be salted here and on this record, don’t be mistaken, this album is a wholly unique unicorn that should be reaching more ears.

31. Matt Andersen – Halfway Home By Morning

This melting pot of a record has it all. Gritty Muscle Shoals Soul, Heartfelt Americana, Gritty Blues, and good old Country. Recorded live in Nashville in the same studio that Jerry Lee Lewis and Emmylou Harris made magic, this one is leaps and bounds better than his also excellent 2016 release Honest Man, and that, in itself, is no small feat.

 

Rock is the New Roll: The Top 100 Albums of 2019 (50-41)

Here it is, the long-awaited list of the best albums of 2019. It has been a really great year for music. We heard from a couple of deceased legends in Harry Nilsson and Leonard Cohen, were treated with new records from Texas Honky Tonk legends Jack Ingram, Corb Lund, and Dale Watson, and bright lights shone for the first time with a bevy of new artists to discover including the one name wonders Lizzo and Yola.

Rock is not dead with White Reaper, Drugdealer and Balck Country Communion all inviting us to a party like it’s 1979. And of course, the singer-songwriter is back. The Boss, Bruce Springsteen, is back and better than ever and Rock is the New Roll favorite Tom Russell gave us a history lesson in 11 songs with October in the Railroad Earth.

This year we will be releasing our top 100 list 10 tasty gems at a time, so sit back, grab your favorite beverage, and enjoy the ear-pleasing top 100 records of the year.

50. Renée Wahl – Cut To The Bone

With a spaghetti western Quentin Tarantino vibe courtesy of her Cracker Jack band The Sworn Secrets, this one sounds like a cross between Melissa Etheridge and Nicki Bluhm.

49. Dale Watson – Call Me Lucky

Truly an original, step back 50 years into Dale Watson’s Honky Tonk World.

48. Beaux Gris Gris & The Apocalypse – Love & Murder

Lead singer Greta Valenti is the straw that stirs this drink, but it doesn’t stop there. This is a lot of Country Blues swagger to love about this album.

47. Molly Tuttle – When You’re Ready

This one is for this of us who think they don’t like bluegrass. With stellar playing and vocals that would make Mary Chapin Carpenter blush, Molly Tuttle should be on your own personal best new artist list.

46. Kingfish – Kingfish

20-year old Christone “Kingfish” Ingram is nothing short of the next great blues prodigy. Growing up in the Mississippi delta just a few miles from the actual “crossroads” just listen to the tone coming from this guy.

45. The Teskey Brothers – Run Home Slow

The Teskey Brothers, and yes, they are real brothers, channel Motown, Blues, Funk, and Blue-Eyed Australian Soul.  With a shuffling rhythm that hooks you on every note, their sound bears similarities to Michael Kiwanuka. Listener beware though, the hipsters are starting to catch on to this band.

44. GospelbeacH – Let It Burn

Much like he did with his former band Beachwood Sparks, with GospelbeacH, lead singer Brent Rademcker, channels Tom Petty and the Laurel Canyon sound with a Country Rock vibe that is timeless. Adding even more to the Pop credentials laid down on the highly excellent 2017 release Another Summer of Love, “Dark Angel” could have been a long lost Heartbreakers song, and even when the band goes low and slow like they do on “Get It Back” there is a cool nostalgia that can be traced back to The Long Run era Eagles. The late Neil Casal, who was a member of Beachwood Sparks, contributes searing solos throughout the record and is a bittersweet presence on an uplifting record.

43. Jade Jackson – Wilderness

No real new ground is broken here, just a solid set of highly listenable Pop tinged Americana tunes. And, that is very special.

42. The Pearlfishers – Love & Other Hopeless Things

This fine Scottish Pop group delivers an often time glorious Brian Wilson inspired set of songs.

41. Lukas Nelson and the Promise of the Real – Turn Off The News (Build a Garden)

As the son of Willie Nelson and the bandleader for Bradley Cooper in A Star is Born, Lukas Nelson is as hot as a firecracker right now. Lukas and his boys have even found the time to release a new record in between concerts as the backing band for Neil Young. With a Traveling Wilburys vibe in places and a widescreen pop dusting in others along with a scent of herbal hippie sensation wafting across the entire proceedings, the experience of listening to this album will be mind-altering.

Rock is the New Roll: The Top 100 Albums of 2019 (60-51)

Here it is, the long-awaited list of the best albums of 2019. It has been a really great year for music. We heard from a couple of deceased legends in Harry Nilsson and Leonard Cohen, were treated with new records from Texas Honky Tonk legends Jack Ingram, Corb Lund, and Dale Watson, and bright lights shone for the first time with a bevy of new artists to discover including the one name wonders Lizzo and Yola.

Rock is not dead with White Reaper, Drugdealer and Balck Country Communion all inviting us to a party like it’s 1979. And of course, the singer-songwriter is back. The Boss, Bruce Springsteen, is back and better than ever and Rock is the New Roll favorite Tom Russell gave us a history lesson in 11 songs with October in the Railroad Earth.

This year we will be releasing our top 100 list 10 tasty gems at a time, so sit back, grab your favorite beverage, and enjoy the ear-pleasing top 100 records of the year.

60. Jamestown Revival – San Isabel

Every 18 months or so Jamestown Revival will release an album and remind me that I really love this band. Their latest, San Isabel, takes them back to their roots and their Simon and Garfunkel by way of CSN vibe. Their loving tribute to California Dreamin’ is worth the price of admission alone.

59. Tyler Childers – Country Squire

A more than solid follow up to his 2017 release, purgatory. The songwriting appears to have a bit more of an edge and even without Sturgill on the knobs the production value is pristine.

58. The Wild Reeds – Cheers

Expanded to a five-piece with a more fleshed out expansive sound that will bring to mind sort of a groovy-tone hybrid of The Go Gos and Fleetwood Mac. All of the songs are pretty much festival stage ready with a bounce that might remind you of Oh Pep!, Lucious, or even First Aid Kit.

57. Los Coast – Samsura

This Austin based combo is a bit genre-defying, and in ‘this case that is a very good thing. Part Soul, part Surf-Rock, a lot Psychedelic, and all Cool. If Jellyfish merged with The Dap-Kings the resulting hybrid might sound like these guys.

56. Jesse Dayton – Mixtape Vol. 1

This covers record is a lot more than a slap-dash between albums mail-it-in effort. This is a seriously eclectic and cool set of songs arranged to perfection with a lot of thought going into the song selection. If Elton’s deep track “Country Comfort” or ACDC’s “Whole Lot of Rosie” isn’t good enough for you the Cars Power Pop gem “Just What I Needed” will have your head spinning until Jesse’s love of Punk comes crashing through on the Clash tune “Bankrobber.” Great stuff indeed.

55. Joseph Arthur – Come Back World

Joseph Arthur is nothing if not prolific. Despite this being his first solo project in three years, Arthur has definitely been part of the scene organically implanting himself into many musically diverse projects including Arthur Buck with Peter Buck, Fistfull of Mercy with Dhani Harrison, Ben Harper, and Jeff Ament. Here, his pals Jesse Malin, Ben Harper, and Patrick Carney join in on the fun with a spirit calming set of his most personal and powerful songs to date.

54. Delbert McClinton – Tall, Dark, And Handsome

Delbert pretty much paints from the entire Blues palette on this one. From Jump Blues to Dirty Blues, Country Blues, and Delta Blues with a little bit of Smokey Jazz mixed in, this one has a little bit of everything. Tall Dark and Handsome Doesn’t break any new ground but should serve to remind us that much like John Hiatt, Delbert McClinton is a National treasure.

53. Robert Ellis – Texas Piano Man

Somehow, right before our very ears, Robert Ellis has turned into Ben Folds. Texas Piano Man is a throwback to the 70’s singer-songwriter in all the best of ways. “Father” is a stunner of a song where a son tries to get to know more about what his father is all about and why he left, the line “I wanted a father but I’ll settle for a friend” pretty much sets the stage on this one. A new direction for sure, but still brilliant.

52. The Lilac Time – Return To Us

A lovely sort of pastoral listen, there is meandering pedal steel that sets much of the tone on this nine-song set. Slightly political in some places, the title track, written three days after the current inauguration, plays off an Obama speech, and elsewhere there is melancholy whimsey in the Country inflected “Simple Things” remembering a time with less technology.

51. Shana Cleveland – Night of the Worm Wood

Known mostly for her work with the Surf-Noir Band La Luz, Shana Cleveland doesn’t stray too far from the vintage guitar, psychedelic haze ambiance on Night of the Worm Moon, her second proper full-length record as a solo artist. The cool, laconic, mostly psychedelic undercurrent that wafts through the entire proceedings like an early era Leonard Cohen poetry reading will instantly take you back to a time when television came in both colors. Black, and white.

“The Fireball” is a shoegaze-y mellow-tron of a tune and “Solar Creep” is a night time chill-out experience. Don’t expect the jams to be kicked out anywhere on this record, just a fine, understated, spectral beauty of a listening journey.

Rock is the New Roll: The Top 100 Albums of 2019 (70-61)

Here it is, the long-awaited list of the best albums of 2019. It has been a really great year for music. We heard from a couple of deceased legends in Harry Nilsson and Leonard Cohen, were treated with new records from Texas Honky Tonk legends Jack Ingram, Corb Lund, and Dale Watson, and bright lights shone for the first time with a bevy of new artists to discover including the one name wonders Lizzo and Yola.

Rock is not dead with White Reaper, Drugdealer and Balck Country Communion all inviting us to a party like it’s 1979. And of course, the singer-songwriter is back. The Boss, Bruce Springsteen, is back and better than ever and Rock is the New Roll favorite Tom Russell gave us a history lesson in 11 songs with October in the Railroad Earth.

This year we will be releasing our top 100 list 10 tasty gems at a time, so sit back, grab your favorite beverage, and enjoy the ear-pleasing top 100 records of the year.

70. Angel Olson – All Mirrors

A bit of a Swiss Army Knife sort of artist, here, Angel Olson mostly shreds her country-inflected Indie-Folk for a more lavish and expansive sound. Bolstered by a 17 piece orchestra, this record should be a master class in how to do Symphonic Pop the right way. From the title track to the moody and expansive “Impasse” your ears will take you on a journey that would make The Moody Blues proud.

69. Twin Peaks – Lookout Low

Famous for their live shows in their home town of Chicago, on Lookout Low the band channels 70’s FM Rock. Produced by Ethan Johns, the setting is Big Star in places and Basement era The Band in others. “Dance Through It” has a Jackson Browne by way of Simple Minds flavor to it and is worth the price of admission alone.

68. Dianne Coffee – Internet Arms

If Prince and David Bowie had a love child he probably would sound like Foxygen drummer Shaun Fleming and his swaggering oddball alter ego Dianne Coffee. Mining the same Glam Psychedelic territory that he favors with his main gig, Internet Arms features mostly mid-tempo synth numbers with “Stuck In Your Saturday Night” a real banger, and “Like A Child Does” dances to the beat of a thoughtful dance tune. This record is the one to put on when you are ready to go out on a Saturday Night.

67. The Plott Hounds – Damn The Wind

This time we mean it! The Plott hounds are definitely one of our new favorite bands. With the first introduction to these guys coming from a live version of “Get High (Down Town Anoka),” the first blast to the ears is courtesy of that voice, the one that belongs to Noah Alexander, the lead singer and guitar player for the group. It’s not only the whiskey-soaked, deep from the bowels of pre-“McArthur Park” Waylon Jennings Outlaw Country hades that overcomes you like the last call at closing time, but it is mostly the passion that the entire band that is what makes The Plott Hounds special.

66. Austin Meade – Waves

This denizen of the Texas hill country lays down a template of 70’s outlaw inspired country-influenced songwriting with more than a touch of Rock as well as Roll.

65. The Yawpers – Human Question

If you could only listen to artists from one single record label then Bloodshot Records should be your jam, and The Yawpers are right up there as show horses in their stable. A little more on the Rock and Roll Side than their last album, “Earn Your Heaven” will Rock your ears off and on “Dancing on My Knees” the rhythm section shows the musicianship and energy worthy of Stevie Ray’s Double Trouble.

64. The Regrettes – How Do You Love

Their Pop driven Punk songs are a must-hear. If the Go Go’s were actually cool they might have sounded like The Regrettes. Their sophomore record is full of Ramones worthy ear blasts.

63. Lizzo – Cuz I Love You

Believe the Hype. Behind the Lizzo-Mania is a serious talent. On her break out record she blends Pop, Soul, R&B with a touch of Hip Hop for good measure. Listen to her get funky on “Cry Baby,” a little frisky on “Better in Color,” and downright bombastic on the stellar “Juice.” Lizzo is one of the best talents to come down the road in a long time.

62. Kyle Craft – Showboat Honey

This dude is a bit genre-defying, this dude is. A bit Kinks, slightly Brit Pop, some Power Pop and Badfinger, but it’s all pretty cool. This one is a nifty follow up to the equally excellent Full Circle Nightmare from all the way back in 2018.

61. Beth Hart – War in My Mind

Beth Hart has never been one to bury her darkest secrets, and on her latest record, she continues to peel away the layers of her soul. This is one of those rare artists that you feel you really know and appreciate simply by listening to her songbook.

Best Albums of 2019: The Who – Who

The surprise here is not that The Who has released their first full-length record of original material since their 2006 release of Endless Wire, the rumors were out on the streets for quite a while now, but the real mind-boggler is that the album is good. And not just good, it is seriously good.

It’s an honest to goodness Who Album! Roger Sounds great! – Larry Carta, Chicago, Illinois

Let’s start with the elephant in the room, Roger Daltry’s voice. After it became necessary to cancel a couple of shows and cut others short, there was a bit of skepticism concerning the quality of the vocal performance we would be getting here. But no worries, on virtually every one of the 14 songs presented here Daltry is in fine vocal form. The arrangements and the songs themselves fit into the pocket just fine, and the times that he seems to be on his way to reaching for a level from days gone by he seems to stop just short, and scale things back to AOR appropriate heights.

From the opening track, “All This Music Will Fade” we get classic Who. strong up-front vocals, whirling guitar courtesy of Pete Townshend, and Ringo sire Zak Starkey making poppa proud from behind the kit. This one is pure mid-’70s Face Dances coolness.

There is a bit of an edge on “Ball and Chain” that has a subtle dusting of “Baba O’Riley” around the edges, and there is a certain chemistry on “I Don’t Want To Get Wise” that is pleasing to the ear with Pete Townsend contributing to the vocals in the background just like the old days. Extra credit here goes to Tom Petty’s ivory tickler Benmont Tench doing side-duty on the Hammond organ.

There are not many hints of nostalgia being professed on the record which is a really good thing, the closest the band comes to addressing any past band turmoil is on “Beads On One String,” a semi-ballad that seems to be equal parts Daltry and Townshend and is exhibit A evidence that the two still bring out the best in each other.

Pete Townshend wrote most of the songs here and on “Got Nothing To Prove” he seems to turn back the clock way back to The Who Sell Out Days taking over the lead vocals on a tune that could be playing right now in the mojo dojo of Austin Powers. And, the delicate Townshend touch is even more evident on the poignant “Danny and My Ponies,” a beautiful song that could fit quite nicely as a key track on any of the band’s back pages. Pete plays all of the instruments on this one including drums and synthesizers.

As an album close-out tune, “Danny and My Ponies” is about as perfect an adieu as you can get. Here’s hoping that this record is the last in a very long list of masterworks. Sometimes it is all right to go out on top, and the band deserves props for producing a swan song of new material instead of resting on greatest hits retread laurels or cover song anthologies.

If this is our last visit with Roger, Pete, and the rest of the band, it has been a life well lived and supremely enjoyed by all.

 

 

 

 

Rock is the New Roll: The Top 100 Albums of 2019 (80-71)

Here it is, the long-awaited list of the best albums of 2019. It has been a really great year for music. We heard from a couple of deceased legends in Harry Nilsson and Leonard Cohen, were treated with new records from Texas Honky Tonk legends Jack Ingram, Corb Lund, and Dale Watson, and bright lights shone for the first time with a bevy of new artists to discover including the one name wonders Lizzo and Yola.

Rock is not dead with White Reaper, Drugdealer and Balck Country Communion all inviting us to a party like it’s 1979. And of course, the singer-songwriter is back. The Boss, Bruce Springsteen, is back and better than ever and Rock is the New Roll favorite Tom Russell gave us a history lesson in 11 songs with October in the Railroad Earth.

This year we will be releasing our top 100 list 10 tasty gems at a time, so sit back, grab your favorite beverage, and enjoy the ear-pleasing top 100 records of the year.

80. The Black Keys – Let’s Rock

After spending time apart from each other going back to 2014 Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney are reunited and it feels so good. Blues, Garage, and Old Soul are still at the core of their sound, but this time around there is a Joie-de-vie amplification that seems to have the band re-energized.

79. The Magpie Salute – High Water II

High Water II, the appropriately titled sequel to High Water I, comes so close to sounding like vintage Black Crowes it might as well be a reunion record. And no, that is not necessarily a bad thing. Heavy on rockers and blues-boogie with an occasional acoustic interlude thrown in for good measure with Rich Robinson providing the guitar riffage. In the battle of the brothers Robinson for world domination, Chris definitely has some catching up to do.

78. Flying Colors – Love Letter

A Progressive Rock supergroup channeling their inner Beatles and ELO, Mike Portnoy, Steve Morse, and Neal Morse join singer Carey McPherson in a harmony drizzled dose of Sunshine Pop. The song “Love Letter” is definitely worth the price of admission alone.

77. Quaker City Nighthawks – Quaker City Nighthawks

Formed in Forth Worth in 2012, the Quaker City Night Hawks are constantly and consistently refining their sound. On their latest self-titled record, they mix funky rockers with piano-led ballads. On “Suit In The Back” they look back to when they were pulled over and arrested for the possession of marijuana concentrate.

76. Allison Moorer – Blood

You will be hard-pressed to listen to a more poignant record this year as Mrs. Hayes Carll presents a biographical record in conjunction with a book release later in the year. Having been raised by her sister Shelby Lynne after her father killed her mother and turned the gun on himself, the album, as well as the book, will take you on an emotional journey that will make you feel alive.

75. Goodbye June – Community Inn

Nashville’s favorite sons Goodbye June finally deliver what should be their breakout album. Full of anthemic Southern Blues Rock with more hooks than a season of Dangerous Catch, this just might be the Rock and Roll record of the year.

74. Miranda Lambert – Wildcard

With her latest album, Wildcard, Miranda Lambert seems to be walking on the wild side after a much-publicized public divorce. Ditching her old producer in favor of Jay Joyce who twirled the knobs for Brothers Osbourne, Brandy Clark, and Ashley McBryde, there seems to be a bounce in her step that wasn’t there before. There is a bit of Swamp Funk on “Holy Water,” and 80’s Rock on “Mess With My Head.” This is a diverse and textured record that will reward multiple listens.

73. Lucille Furs – Another Land

With a Magical Mystery Tour as your tour guide, Lucille Furs and Another Land will time warp you back to superspy Austin Powers groovy bachelor pad at the blink of a mellotron.

72. Jade Bird – Jade Bird

One of the British shining stars on the Americana Folk scene, on her debut record there are soaring pop epics the likes of “Side Effects,” introspective slow burners with “My Beauty” where she sounds like Melissa Etheridge in her prime, and on the low and slow “Does Anybody Know” her songwriting talents really shine. This one will be on heavy rotation for quite a long time.

71. Black Star Riders – Another State of Grace

With a more than solid follow up to 2017’s album Heavy Fire, this band born from the ashes of Thin Lizzy continues to place themselves on the mount Rushmore of bands that are saving Rock and Roll. The song “Don’t Let Me Down” is a distant cousin to Lizzy’s “Dancing In The Moonlight and is worth the price of admission alone.” The title track is Thin Lizzy meets Dropkick Murphy’s.

Five Cool Ones: Five Cool Records Released This Week (December 6, 2019)

While we are still, without a lot of success, trying to stay away from the Christmas music scene, some fine musical nuggets are reaching our ears including the new album by The Who.

The Who – Who

With what, hopefully, will be their last record, the Who set the flag in the ground for a grand departure. The record is actually quite good with Daltry not overstepping his diminished vocals by not trying too hard to hit those high notes from days gone by. He is staying in his lane, letting Pete do the heavy lifting and the results are close to vintage Face Dances Who.

Pitbull – Libertad 548

Here, at Rock is the New Roll we have a few guilty pleasures. Along with The Bay City Rollers, The Sweet, and Eddie Murphy’s “Party All The Time,” another one of these is Pitbull. While we will stand on Snoop Dogg’s coffee table and proclaim “Fireball” as our number one party starter of all time, we don’t care how many bitches you have in the living room getting it on, there is always room for another Mr. Worldwide record to make it rain for us.

Hurt Valley – Glacial Pace

A somewhat appropriately monikered record,  Hurt Valley’s Glacial Pace is a low-key gently paced pastoral adventure in hi-fi. There is a gentle psychedelic haze around this entire affair. Spark one up while you are listening to this one.

Chad Kostner – Highway 63

A newcomer to our ears, Chad Kostner has a voice that falls somewhere north of Steve Earle and South of Bryan Adams, and we think it’s cool. Born in Chicago and raised in Wisconsin, he has graduated from drinking and party songs to solidly introspective crafted John Prine inspired tunesmithing.

Los Colognes – From The Vault

Better musicos than us have tried and failed to genre identify Los Colognes. There is a definite hippy Laurel Canyon vibe weed-wafting in the air tonight essence going on with these guys, but there is more than meets the ear going on here. The twangy jam-oriented arrangements have a Grateful Dead meets Fleetwood Mac essence about them, and if you are deep into this band it is almost like you are in a secret society that revels in its underground status. Here, we have an abient scented E.P. that is best absorbed in a dark room with Tommy Chong.