Five Cool Ones: Five New Albums Released This Week (July 23, 2021)

With the euphoric sense that the lockdown releases are behind us, artists are beginning to focus on more positive themes, less political nonsense, and seem to be getting back to the basics of rock and roll. And quite frankly, we are all the better for it.

The Black Keys are digging even deeper down that well of blues with this iconic song from their Delta Kream record.

Dan Israel puts everything in perspective with this easy flowing, perfect for driving down to the sea tune, “The Hang of It.”

And Eric Bazilian, the frontman for the Hooters, takes us back to the glorious ’80s with his latest single, “Back In The ’80s.”

If all of that is not enough, here are five more nuggets that are entering our ear-waves this week.

The Peppermint Kicks – The Peppermint Kicks

A Power Pop supergroup with members of The Stompers, The Amplifier Heads, and the Shang Hi Los all representing, Peppermint Kicks lays down a hipster blend of Pop-Punk, Rock, and infectious Power Pop. “When Rock & Roll Met Your Dad” is essentially a love letter to the healing powers of rock & roll, while “Hey Fanzine!” pays homage to those great music magazines from days of yore, Creem, Rolling Stone (when they were a music magazine), Circus, and more. The spirit of Cheap Trick and The Ramones are all over this record, most notably on “Shag ’72” and the ode to pointless rock and roll “I Don’t Hear a Single.”

Coolness resides around every corner on this record that even laments the demise of the hallowed long-lost rock venues with “Johnny D’s (Play It Again)” and the lack of bands that don’t play loud anymore on the semi-loud “Stooge.”

For those of a certain age, this love letter to a time and space before corporate rock will put you in that long-lost ear space that you forgot you missed.

Rodney Crowell – Triagethis time around he

The national Texas treasure that is Rodney Crowell is back with his 18th album. A bit more introspective now, this time around he leaves the negativity to others in favor of songs of sin, mortality, and redemption. The title track compares love to forgiveness, “Something Has To Change” calls out those that darken the world, and “This Body Isn’t All There Is To Me” pretty much says it all.

Though the mood is a bit more somber from what we are used to from Rodney, after all, we are in a pandemic, let’s hold out hope that better times are right around the corner. And, what better tour guide than Rodney Crowell.

Glen Campbell – Live From The Troubadour

Given the state of his health at the time of this recording in 2008 when he opens this show from the famed Troubadour concert venue in L.A. saying it is good to be back at the Hungry I, it takes a beat to realize that he is joking. Here, on one of his last tours, Glen Campbell covers all of his musical muses. His more recent tunes, including “Grow Old With Me” and “All I Want Is You” are intermingled with Jimmy Web Classics “Galveston,” “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” along with the Cambell must-play Classics “Rhinestone Cowboy” and “Gentle On My Mind.”

There are flashes of brilliance on display throughout the set, most notably during “Phoenix” when Cambell calls out “I wanna play one” as he drifts off into a Les Paul worthy guitar interlude. But, for the most part, the set is a poignant reminder of an artist that we have forgotten that we loved giving us one last Hurrah.

Jackson Browne – Downhill From Everywhere

Like an old relative that comes back to visit between military assignments regaling with tales of travel in far-off lands, Jackson Browne is back on our shores with another set of masterclass storytelling. And, he doesn’t seem to have changed one bit.

“My Cleveland Heart” could be the centerpiece in a movie score in the vein of “Somebody’s Baby,” The title track has a timeless feel to it and could have been on the Lawyers in Love record, and “A Human Touch” would have been perfect The Pretender fodder.

Part nostalgic head-trip and part treatise on the state of the world, this one has something for everyone.

Velvet Insane – Rock ‘n’ Roll Glitter Suit

There is truth in advertising seeping through every poor of the sophomore record from these purveyors of Glam Rock. Starting with the insanely catchy “Backstreet Liberace” the stage is set for bringing up the ghosts of Slade, The Sweet, T Rex along with the rest of the Glam gang from the ’70s.

Right up there with Luke Spiller and The Struts this gang of Swedes drives it like they own it on the Slade worthy “Driving Down the Mountain” even display their tender side on the ballad “Midnight Sunshine Serenade”

Unless Luke and the boys come up with something out of this world later in the year, the best Rock album of 2022 has officially surfaced.

Author: falconi5

A place for musically minded folk to get together and share ideas, reviews, and basically spread the word.

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